Built-up roofing systems, often known as BUR systems, are among the most frequent types of commercial roofing built-up systems. Built-Up Roofing Systems have a history that spans more than a century in the United States.

Many people call these systems “tar and gravel” roofs. Installing built-up roofs is done by layering asphalt or tar and supporting textiles on top of each other on the roof.

The number of layers (or plies) that can be installed can be selected by the user. Stone or gravel is the last layer of a built-up roofing structure.

A typical built-up roofing system costs between $5.50 and $8.50 per square foot* to install on a standard business roof. Depending on the materials you select, this pricing range may shift.

In this blog, we’ll discuss what BUR commercial roofing is, how it differs from other types, and whether or not it’s worth the investment.

Benefits of a Built-Up Roofing System.

A commercial built-up roof can endure up to 40 years if it is properly erected and maintained. Other advantages of built-up roofing systems include:

  • Waterproof:

The lack of seams and joints eliminates the most vulnerable region for leakage.

  • UV Rays Protection:

Anti-ultraviolet protection is provided by it.

  • Easy to Maintain: 

After installation, little maintenance is required.

For a new commercial roof, you have several options to choose from.  But BUR can be a massive asset for the modern roofing system.

Popular Types o BUR(Built-Up Roof System)

Modified bitumen and ballast roofs are the two primary forms of built-up roofs:

Modified Bitumen BUR:

Bitumen-built-up roofing systems typically have three or more layers.

Ply sheets, the base asphalt layer with modifiers, and the top surface are included. Asphalt is the primary waterproofing material in modified bitumen roofs, but synthetic rubber is added to provide a more consistent matrix.

As a result, the asphalt is more resistant to punctures and stronger. Enhancing its resistance to permanent deformation when stretching under pressure also improves its physical qualities like elasticity.

The inside sheets’ stability, weather resistance, and tensile strength can be given by reinforced fabric, felt, fiberglass, polyester, or plastic core materials.

The upper layer shields the lower layers from the sun’s harsh rays, rain, and other debris. Your business built-up roof’s underlying layers are protected from moisture and heat damage by this layer, which also traps and releases heat.

Ballast Roofing:

When referring to a roof as having been ballasted, we indicate that the roof membrane is in no manner fastened or bonded to the decking material. However, it is weighted down with ballast, which is often gravel.

Large stones are then put on the top layer of this sheet, which is made up of many membranes. The large rocks on the top layer protect the lower layers from adhering to the roof framework.

Several points on the deck are used to secure these layers to prevent them from moving about too much.

The visual appeal of ballast roofing can’t be overstated. It’s possible to only utilize a ballast on top of the roof for the walkway, which provides a stable platform to walk and allows for easy access in the event of any repairs.

However, individual ballast stones may fall loose during a storm, posing a severe safety risk. Due to the greater stability and inflexibility of paving stones in high gusts, contractors have switched to utilizing them instead.

Contact R&D Roofing 

R&D Roofing Company repairs and maintains built-up commercial roofing. Call 727-351-2697 or 786-379-5843 for a free quotation.