Archives for June 2022

Everything You Need to Know About Slate Roof Repairs

Slate is one of the most attractive and durable roofing materials. Slate roofing demonstrates the strength of nature and the skill of the artisan who painstakingly shaped and nailed it to the roof.

With correct installation, slate roofs may endure anywhere from 60 to 125 years or more, depending on the type of slate used and other factors such as the roof’s design and location. Over 200 years, some slates have been proven to hold up well.

It is not strange to see slate roofs on government, religious, and institutional buildings, where long-term durability is a significant factor in material selection.

However, farm and agricultural structures were frequently constructed with slate in the country’s quarrying regions, where the material is abundant. 

In this blog, R&D Roofing will represent every possible detail of slate roof repairs.

How to Repair A Slate Roof?

Now, how can you fix the slate on your roof so that it continues to look excellent over time? Here is some critical aspects to remember when repairing your slate roof:

Inspect Your Roof Every Spring

It’s a good idea to inspect your roof for damage in the spring when you’re likely to need to clean your gutters and do other routine maintenance. Moreover, take a look at your roof’s slate tiles. Any complications that could arise, such as:

  • Shattered slates
  • Slates are “hanging” or “loose” relative to the rest of the root.
  • The slate that has been harmed in any way.
  • Roofing tiles that have missing slates, resulting in gaps.

To address minor roof problems, you may be able to do it yourself. It’s best to call in a professional if you detect a significant number of broken or missing tiles.

Ensure that You Have the Appropriate Equipment

Slate roof repairs necessitate the use of specialized equipment. Before trying slate roof repair yourself, have the following tools:

  • A hammer
  • A pry bar with a flat surface.
  • A slate ripper.
  • A slate saw to cut your new slate to the correct dimensions.
  • A ladder.

Additionally, depending on your roofing system, you may require:

  • Hooks are made out of slate.
  • Nailing copper roof shingles down with copper nails.
  • A copper necktie with a clasp.
  • Refurbished slates
  • It is necessary to use caulk and a caulk gun in this situation.

Slate Hook vs. “Nail & Bib Roof”: Know the Difference

The two most used nowadays are the “nail and bib” and “slate hook” techniques of slate roofing installation.

It is done by nailing each slate tile to the roofing underlayment with copper roofing nails. However, to prevent corrosion and water damage to the nails, a copper “bib” flashing is put over them and secured below the slate.

Instead, slate hooks are hammered directly into the underlayment with a long, thin nail. Next, the slate is lowered onto the pin and let hang loosely. The hook and the slate tiles that surround it on both sides hold the slate in place.

Before attempting to replace a slate tile on your own, make sure you know what kind of roof you have.

Watching Videos on YouTube Can Help You Learn

You’ve discovered damaged slates on your roof, determined whether it uses a slate hook, nail, or bib, and bought the necessary materials. Surely you’re eager to get started?

Even if you are a hands-on learner, watching an expert do it before trying it yourself is a good idea. You can find lots of Slate roof repair videos on YouTube.

Bottom Line

You’ll be able to do most slate roof repair chores on your own with the help of these suggestions and instructions. If you’re looking to repair a slate roof that has been damaged or discounted, you’ll need to hire a specialist.

Repairing a slate roof is best left to a professional slater like R&D roofing.

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Everything You Need to Know About Built-Up Commercial Roofing System

Built-up roofing systems, often known as BUR systems, are among the most frequent types of commercial roofing built-up systems. Built-Up Roofing Systems have a history that spans more than a century in the United States.

Many people call these systems “tar and gravel” roofs. Installing built-up roofs is done by layering asphalt or tar and supporting textiles on top of each other on the roof.

The number of layers (or plies) that can be installed can be selected by the user. Stone or gravel is the last layer of a built-up roofing structure.

A typical built-up roofing system costs between $5.50 and $8.50 per square foot* to install on a standard business roof. Depending on the materials you select, this pricing range may shift.

In this blog, we’ll discuss what BUR commercial roofing is, how it differs from other types, and whether or not it’s worth the investment.

Benefits of a Built-Up Roofing System.

A commercial built-up roof can endure up to 40 years if it is properly erected and maintained. Other advantages of built-up roofing systems include:

  • Waterproof:

The lack of seams and joints eliminates the most vulnerable region for leakage.

  • UV Rays Protection:

Anti-ultraviolet protection is provided by it.

  • Easy to Maintain: 

After installation, little maintenance is required.

For a new commercial roof, you have several options to choose from.  But BUR can be a massive asset for the modern roofing system.

Popular Types o BUR(Built-Up Roof System)

Modified bitumen and ballast roofs are the two primary forms of built-up roofs:

Modified Bitumen BUR:

Bitumen-built-up roofing systems typically have three or more layers.

Ply sheets, the base asphalt layer with modifiers, and the top surface are included. Asphalt is the primary waterproofing material in modified bitumen roofs, but synthetic rubber is added to provide a more consistent matrix.

As a result, the asphalt is more resistant to punctures and stronger. Enhancing its resistance to permanent deformation when stretching under pressure also improves its physical qualities like elasticity.

The inside sheets’ stability, weather resistance, and tensile strength can be given by reinforced fabric, felt, fiberglass, polyester, or plastic core materials.

The upper layer shields the lower layers from the sun’s harsh rays, rain, and other debris. Your business built-up roof’s underlying layers are protected from moisture and heat damage by this layer, which also traps and releases heat.

Ballast Roofing:

When referring to a roof as having been ballasted, we indicate that the roof membrane is in no manner fastened or bonded to the decking material. However, it is weighted down with ballast, which is often gravel.

Large stones are then put on the top layer of this sheet, which is made up of many membranes. The large rocks on the top layer protect the lower layers from adhering to the roof framework.

Several points on the deck are used to secure these layers to prevent them from moving about too much.

The visual appeal of ballast roofing can’t be overstated. It’s possible to only utilize a ballast on top of the roof for the walkway, which provides a stable platform to walk and allows for easy access in the event of any repairs.

However, individual ballast stones may fall loose during a storm, posing a severe safety risk. Due to the greater stability and inflexibility of paving stones in high gusts, contractors have switched to utilizing them instead.

Contact R&D Construction and Roofing 

R&D Construction and Roofing repairs and maintains built-up commercial roofing. Call 727-351-2697 or 786-379-5843 for a free estimate.

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